Edited by Gregor Benton and Lin Chun, Was Mao... - A centralized location for your leftist literature
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Edited by Gregor Benton and Lin Chun, Was Mao Really a Monster?: The Academic Response to Chang and Halliday’s “Mao: The Unknown Story” (2009)
Formats Available

.PDF
.PDF (alternative link)
Complete Introduction at China Study Group
William Hinton: On the Role of Mao Zedong
MLM Study: Chinese Foreign Policy during the Maoist Era and its Lessons for Today (2007) (PDF)
Utsa Patnaik: The Economic Ideas of Mao Zedong: Agricultural Transformation (2003)

Mao: The Unknown Story by Jung Chang and Jon Halliday was published in 2005 to a great fanfare. The book predictably portrays Mao as a monster – equal to or worse than Hitler and Stalin – and a fool who won power by native cunning and ruled by terror. It received a rapturous welcome from reviewers in the popular press and rocketed to the top of the worldwide bestseller list. Few works on China by writers in the West have achieved its impact. Reviews by serious China scholars, however, tended to take a vastly different view. Most were sharply critical, questioning its authority and the authors’ methods, arguing that Chang and Halliday’s book is not at all a work of balanced scholarship, as it purports to be, but a highly selective and blatantly revisionist polemical study that sets out to demonize Mao and the achievements of Chinese Socialism. This book brings together sixteen reviews of Mao: The Unknown Story – all by internationally well-regarded specialists in modern Chinese history – and published in relatively specialized scholarly journals. Taken together, they demonstrate that Chang and Halliday’s portrayal of Mao is in most places wholly inaccurate. While agreeing that Mao had faults and bears responsibility for some unfortunate policies, they conclude that a far more balanced picture is needed, thus providing one.

Edited by Gregor Benton and Lin Chun, Was Mao Really a Monster?: The Academic Response to Chang and Halliday’s “Mao: The Unknown Story” (2009)

Formats Available

.PDF

.PDF (alternative link)

Complete Introduction at China Study Group

William Hinton: On the Role of Mao Zedong

MLM Study: Chinese Foreign Policy during the Maoist Era and its Lessons for Today (2007) (PDF)

Utsa Patnaik: The Economic Ideas of Mao Zedong: Agricultural Transformation (2003)

Mao: The Unknown Story by Jung Chang and Jon Halliday was published in 2005 to a great fanfare. The book predictably portrays Mao as a monster – equal to or worse than Hitler and Stalin – and a fool who won power by native cunning and ruled by terror. It received a rapturous welcome from reviewers in the popular press and rocketed to the top of the worldwide bestseller list. Few works on China by writers in the West have achieved its impact. Reviews by serious China scholars, however, tended to take a vastly different view. Most were sharply critical, questioning its authority and the authors’ methods, arguing that Chang and Halliday’s book is not at all a work of balanced scholarship, as it purports to be, but a highly selective and blatantly revisionist polemical study that sets out to demonize Mao and the achievements of Chinese Socialism. This book brings together sixteen reviews of Mao: The Unknown Story – all by internationally well-regarded specialists in modern Chinese history – and published in relatively specialized scholarly journals. Taken together, they demonstrate that Chang and Halliday’s portrayal of Mao is in most places wholly inaccurate. While agreeing that Mao had faults and bears responsibility for some unfortunate policies, they conclude that a far more balanced picture is needed, thus providing one.

#mao #china #prc #socialism #biography #maoism #history #chinese history #revisionism #mao zedong #mao tse tung #communism #chinese socialism #gpcl
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tagged as: #mao #china #prc #socialism #biography #maoism #history #chinese history #revisionism #mao zedong #mao tse tung #communism #chinese socialism #gpcl

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